Monday, August 01, 2016

MMGM- She Stood for Freedom

It's Marvelous Middle Grade Monday at Ramblings of a Wannabe Scribe and What Are You Reading? day at Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers. It's also Nonfiction Monday.

This was an interesting publishing phenomenon. Usually, we see really long nonfiction that may cover a person who made less than optimal life choices made into "Young Readers Editions" so we don't get all of the dirt on, say, Louis Zamperini's exploits in Unbroken. But to see a picture book version and one only 24 pages longer seems interesting. 

I ended up reading both, because our 7th grade is working to put together a Civil Rights unit and we were investigating biographies. I've included the ISBN numbers so if these look good, you get the right one for your library. 

Both E ARCS from Edelweiss Above the Treeline.

26861970Loki Mulholland, Angela Fairwell, Charlotta Janssen (Illustrator)
She Stood for Freedom: The Untold Story of a Civil Rights Hero, Joan Trumpauer Mulholland 
 June 7th 2016 by Shadow Mountain
Hardcover Picture Book40 pages
162972176X (ISBN13: 9781629721767)

This had less information, and most of the photographs were embellished in the way that the cover of this book is. 

I wanted more information, and to see the actual pictures, so I will buy the other edition. 

27778444Loki Mulholland, Angela Fairwell, Charlotta Janssen (Illustrator)
She Stood for Freedom: The Untold Story of a Civil Rights Hero, Joan Trumpauer Mulholland 

 August 2nd 2016 by Shadow Mountain
Hardcover64 pages
1629721778 (ISBN13: 9781629721774)

Joan Trumpauer was raised in the South but felt from an early age that the way blacks were treated was unfair. Since she was a teenager when the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s was heating up, she got involved. Other white people gave her an especially hard time, and occasionally the blacks she was trying to help were wary of her, but she managed to be in a lot of important places with influential people. 

My school is predominately white, and there were some parents who complained that when we studied Civil Rights, there was no specific mention of "good white people". Interestingly enough, there are LOTS of fiction books from the point of view of white people who are sympathetic to the 1960s plight of black citizens. 

We need a LOT more books on various facets of the Civil Rights Movement. It was very difficult to find resources when we were doing the unit. 

I vastly preferred the 64 page version of this book, because it was easier to see the actual photographs and there was more information. I would have liked to have had some more information about Mulholland's life after the movement, or about the movement in general. 


Kendra said...

I had never heard of Joan Trumpauer Mulholland until your blog post. There is new learning for me here to explore. Thanks!

Tara Smith said...

Well, now I must be off to do some research on Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, too! I teach at a predominantly white school, too, and parents always request "good white people" books when we learn about the Civil Rights Era. I find this understandable, but sad, too.

Ms. Yingling said...

My family is very heavily German, but it never occurred to me to find Holocaust books about "good Germans", although there were many! It's a difficult topic to cover, whether dealing with history or current day events. I really liked the Kekla Magoon title about Little Rock, too.

Linda B said...

I'll look for this too, a new name and title, Karen? Is the sixties trilogy by Deborah Wiles helpful to the civil rights units? They included great photos of all people in the fight. Thanks for your assessment of both editions.

Rosi said...

Thanks. This is someone I've heard nothing about. I appreciate the post.

Kellee Moye (@kelleemoye) said...

I did not know of these books or about Joan Mulholland. Thank you so much for sharing these! I will have to get them.

Happy reading this week :)

Crystal Brunelle said...

She's a person new to me. Thanks!

Cheriee Weichel said...

I think I would like to read the second book here. You are right that there are many sympathetic white characters in fiction. (I'm thinking of Revolution by Deborah Wiles)

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